Tips for Medical Flight Paramedics to Pack a Wound with Extensive Bleeding

When you are in the air ambulance industry, it is natural that you come across different cases and incidents on a daily basis. You may often have to be part of missions in which the patient has been in a critical accident and is suffering from a serious injury. In such cases, there is a huge chance that they are suffering from a wound that is bleeding heavily. This makes it crucial for you stay updated with tips on how you can pack such wounds and provide better medical flight service and effective care for such patients.

Key Wound-Packing Tips for Medical Flight Paramedics

Take a look at the following useful tips in order to better improve how you pack wounds that are bleeding severely:

  • Direct pressure – Applying direct pressure on the wound is the first step you will need to carry out. You can use a gauze, rag, hand, knee, or whatever is available to stem the flow as you prepare your supplies.
  • Pushing in the wound – Now the next step is to push hard in the wound using your hand or finger so you can stop the bleeding.
  • Proper packing – One of the most crucial steps for medical flight paramedics is to pack gauze (plain or hemostatic) into the wound. Keep doing this until no more gauze can go in.
  • More pressure – Once you’re done with this step, apply firm pressure against the wound for about three minutes. This combined effort of wound packing and firm pressure usually does the trick to stop the bleeding.

After this, you will need to reassess the wound and see if the bleeding has stopped. If it has, you can then begin the transportation process but if it hasn’t, you will need to repeat the process.

Important Facts about Impaired Consciousness for US Air Ambulance Crews

If you are part of an air ambulance crew, it’s likely that you get through some days working overtime and having to respond to multiple calls in a day. While this is all part of the job, it’s important to remember that long shifts and over-exhausted can leave you feeling drained – both physically and mentally. The result will be impaired consciousness, which can prevent you from doing your job properly. This is why US air ambulance paramedics need to ensure that they get proper sleep whenever possible.

Signs US Air Ambulance Paramedics Should Watch Out For

Whether you work for an air ambulance or a ground ambulance, being an EMS provider means there is a high risk of chronic sleep deprivation. Maybe you are secretly proud of yourself for being able to perform well despite lack of sleep. While you may be able to do so for a few days, over time you’re just going to experience impaired consciousness. This can be dangerous for your job, for the lives of your patients, and for yourself.

As a US air ambulance paramedic, here are some signs you should watch out for telling you that you need to get some sleep ASAP:

  • Inability to remember the last call you responded to
  • Inability to distinguish one patient from the other
  • More than normal illegible writing
  • Strong smell of coffee and/or Red Bull while urinating
  • Impaired ability to read patients’ vital signs
  • Impaired ability to distinguish reality from dreams

These are just a few of the more common signs of impaired consciousness among EMS providers. It may be easy to be in denial, making it difficult for you to honestly assess yourself using these signs. Get help from a partner or a fellow crew member that you trust.

What Air Medical Transport Crews should know about Acute Coronary Syndrome

Acute coronary syndrome or ACS is a term used for describing different myocardial (heart) conditions caused by a sudden reduction of blood flow to the heart muscle. This could result in heart attacks, cardiac arrests, and more. The patients suffering from these conditions require immediate care, making ACS a time-sensitive condition. So as an air medical transport crew, you need to administer the necessary pre-hospital care aiming towards rapid reperfusion, which involves the suddenly blocked coronary artery.

Important Pre-Hospital ACS care Tips for Air Medical Transport Crew

When providing pre-hospital care to patients suffering from any kind of ACS, here are some important tips you can make use of:

  • If the patient has a normal oxygen saturation level, it may be harmful to administer supplemental oxygen. So make sure you consider their SpO2 readings before you resort to supplemental oxygen use.
  • If the patient doe not have an allergy towards aspirin or is suffering from active gastrointestinal bleeding, immediate administration of aspirin is highly recommended. In order to ensure that the aspirin enters the bloodstream more rapidly, make sure the pill is chewed instead of being swallowed whole.
  • Although air medical transport crews can safely administer fibrinolytic therapy, it is not recommended if you can get the patient to a PCI center quickly. It is only recommended for use if the transport time is greater than 30 minutes.
  • Transporting a cardiac arrest patient to a PCI center at least 24 hours after the arrest is essential for better chance of survival.

When you are a part of an in-flight medical crew, it’s highly likely that you’ll encounter patients with chest pain every now and then. This makes it crucial to educate yourself on the latest assessment and treatment guidelines for acute coronary syndrome.

Sepsis Care Tips for Medical Flight Paramedics

Sepsis is commonly referred to as blood poisoning. It takes more lives than cancer and is more common than a heart attack. In fact, more than 4,000 children die in the U.S. every year because of sepsis. This makes it crucial for medical flight paramedics to proactively assess and care for patients with suspected sepsis. So here’s a brief guide to help you understand how to care for patients with this condition.

Initial Assessment for Septic Patients

Properly assessing a patient is crucial for medical flight paramedics and EMS providers alike. This speeds up the medical treatment process and also ensures the administration of appropriate care. In order to assess a patient suspected of having sepsis, it’s important to measure the body temperature accurately. A fever or a body temperature lower than normal may be detected if a patient has sepsis.

Fevers, chills, and body aches are some common symptoms of an infection. But not all patients may experience this especially when it comes to older individuals. Enquire about recent procedures like diagnostic tests or surgery, which may expose the patient to an infection risk. In addition, it’s important to measure the lactate level of a patient. If it’s greater than 4 mmols, it could be a strong indicator of sepsis.

To further confirm your suspicion of sepsis, it’s important to measure the exhaled carbon dioxide level of a patient. While a normal capnography reading may range between 35 and 45 mm Hg, a patient with sepsis generally exhibits a reading lower than 25 mm Hg. If this level of reading coincides with other vital signs that drove your suspicion of sepsis, the patient may be in need of immediate medical care.

Sepsis Treatment for Medical Flight Paramedics

It’s crucial to initiate sepsis treatment by administering large amounts of fluid to the patient. While you initiate antibiotic therapy, you may also need to maintain vascular tone through vasopressors like dopamine or norepinephrine.