Do You Have Shift Work Disorder? Self-Assessment Tips for Medical Flight Workers

The life of paramedic, nurse, doctor, or pilot is hectic especially if you’re working for an air ambulance. You run the risk of fatigue and you may be unable to balance your work and life efficiently. And if you work in shifts, you’re also at risk of developing a disorder known as shift work disorder. This could impair your ability to carry out your medical flight duties efficiently.

Shift Work Disorder Could Pose Threats to Medical Flight Workers

When you’re in the air ambulance industry, your physical and mental health is crucial because you have other people depending on you. So if you suspect that you have developed shift work disorder, it would be wise to seek treatment immediately. Here are some of the common symptoms to help you assess yourself:

  • Being sleepy excessively at times when you need to stay awake
  • Being unable to fall asleep when you need to or waking up before getting sufficient sleep
  • Constantly getting insufficient sleep or being unable to get restful sleep
  • Lack of energy
  • Lack of concentration
  • Irritability and depressive moods

Due to all these issues, you may even face problems maintaining healthy personal relationships – whether it’s with your partner, colleagues, or family members.

Causes of Shift Work Disorder

Shift work disorder, as the name suggests, is common in people who work shifts. And that’s why people who work in a medical flight run a high risk of developing the disorder. Night shifts and rotating shifts as well as early morning shifts can result in shift work disorder.

And due to shift work disorder, you may eventually experience chronic sleep deprivation, which can seriously ruin your health, safety, and productivity. You’ll normally find yourself struggling to stay awake when you need to and restless when you should be asleep.

Tips to Overcome Sleep Problems for Medical Flight Crews

Whether you’re a pilot, a paramedic, a nurse, or a doctor; working in a medical flight crew means one thing – shift work. And shift work can bring with it several issues and can particularly affect your sleeping pattern. And lack of proper sleep can take its toll on your physical and mental health. In this post, you will learn how to overcome sleep issues that result from working in shifts.

How to get Better Sleep – Medical Flight Crews

Lack of sleep can make you lethargic. This could in turn impact your ability to carry out your duties as a medical flight crew member as it impacts your attention, concentration, and reaction time. Here are a few things you can do to overcome your sleep issues:

  • Naps – Naps can refresh your mind and give you more alertness to carry out your duties. If you’re working the night shift, try to take a quick nap before you head to work.
  • Proper meals – Regardless of your schedule, try to maintain regular eating hours and have at least three proper meals a day. By having a regular meal time, you signal your body clock and makes sure it knows when to induce sleepiness.
  • Prepare for shift changes – Your crew may have rotating shifts, which makes it difficult to maintain a regular sleep schedule. But before your shift schedule changes, you could try adjusting your sleep time gradually so your body can adapt to the change. Instead of subjecting your body to a sudden change, you’ll be easing it into the new shift schedule so you won’t face too many sleep issues.

In some cases, you may even need medications to help you fall asleep after shift changes. But you should never use them as a long-term solution.

Guidelines for Handling Medical Flight Patients Who Have Fainted (Part 2)

In a previous post, we talked about some of the specific guidelines you need to follow when treating patients who have fainted. Also known as syncope, fainting is a common occurrence and as a medical flight paramedic, you may encounter a few patients in this situation. In this post, you’ll get more details about the guidelines released by the American College of Cardiology so you can get a thorough understanding of what to do.

More tips on handling medical flight patients with syncope

The previous post talked about the initial steps you need to take when you encounter a patient who has fainted. And those steps can be used by medical flight paramedics. According to the American College of Cardiology, health care professionals can follow the guidelines below when they have to treat a patient who faints:

  1. Some patients may have fainted because of irregular heartbeats, which can even be life-threatening. To determine whether your patient is facing this issue, doctors can use an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator to regulate the heartbeats.
  2. For syncope patients who have heart conditions, beta-blockers can be a good option.
  3. Health care providers should advise fainting patients to restrict their exercise in the future.
  4. Patients with recurring fainting spells resulting from very low heart rate might require pacemakers. In case of patients with common faints, drugs may be enough to control the situation.
  5. In case of unexplained fainting, heart rhythm monitoring is a good option to determine whether or not the patient has intermittent heart rhythm issues resulting in fainting.

The American College of Cardiology also advises athletes with fainting issues to visit an experienced health care provider for a heart assessment. These are some of the basic guidelines that can help in providing the right level of care for people who faint.

Guide for Medical Flight Paramedics to Prepare Individual First Aid Kits

When you’re a medical care provider, there’s no knowing when your help might suddenly be required even on your off day. And your intervention can make all the difference for someone who needs immediate medical care. That’s why medical flight paramedics, doctors, nurses, and EMS paramedics alike should take it upon themselves to carry individual first aid kits.

What Medical Flight Paramedics Need in a Personal First Aid Kit

Before you prepare your individual first aid kit, you need to be sure about what you should expect out of the kit. Of course you can’t carry around every type of medical equipment that you normally work on. But the kit should contain some basic items that can help you provide care in common emergency situations.

Your personal first aid kit should be easy to carry around inside your bag or pockets. You should be able to access it easily but make sure you keep it protected from the elements. Although there may be several pre-stocked personal first aid kits available at your local pharmacy, it doesn’t hurt to prepare one on your own.

Content Ideas for Personal First Aid Kits

When considering which items to include in the kit, think of what you would normally use to treat minor injuries or aches. Band aids, cotton balls, and over-the-counter pain meds are a few examples. In addition to this, medical flight paramedics can include items like bandages, antibiotic ointments, gauze pads, etc. in their personal first aid kits.

You can customize the contents as needed. Every once in a while, you might even want to revise what you include in the kit. If you hardly need a certain item, for instance, you could switch it out with something else that you normally need but hadn’t included yet.