Tackling Psychosis on Air Ambulance

Psychosis can be a real problem for air ambulance professionals as they try to offer the best possible care during transport. Most often, specialists are relied upon to care for such patients during air ambulance travel. However, there are often cases where psychosis is simply a result of the situation that the patient is in and not necessarily a pre-existing condition. Therefore, the air ambulance professionals do not necessarily have any means to expect a situation like this. The reasons for the condition may be several and the response can vary from case to case. We look at some of such scenarios and discuss the best way to handle them.

Drug-Induced Psychosis on Air Ambulance

Crystal meth, cocaine, and a few designer drugs can induce severe psychosis in patients where they exhibit paranoid and panicky behaviour. The first course of action in such cases is administration of an antipsychotic drug. Restraints are not usually necessary unless the patient needs immediate IV medication. In such cases, a mild manual restraint is, most often, enough. However, unexpected display of physical strength during psychosis can warrant more effective and long- lasting restraints until hospital care is made available. The air ambulance professionals, in such instances, must ensure that the pulmonary function of the patient is not compromised in any way owing to the restraints.

Handing Patients with Pre-existing Mental Ailments

An example would be a schizophrenic who might need both medications and restraints to ensure smooth air ambulance travel. Usually, a qualified medical professional accompanies the patient in such situations. Then, there are also those patients who suffer from mild psychosis. The first approach to handle them is simply soothing words. Keeping such patients calm is often a matter of saying the right thing. Accompanying family members who know how to handle the patient are a huge help in cases like these.

A Typical Day in the Life of Medical Flight Professionals

The life of medical flight professionals can be quite adrenaline pumped most of the time but that does not preclude them from the responsibilities that come with being a part of the air ambulance industry. The training, the safety measures and the need to be on the call all the time are just some of the tasks that they are expected to undertake. Of course, the gratitude that they receive for saving lives is an additional bonus that perhaps every medical flight professional enjoys. Most people who become a part of the air ambulance industry very well know that they are stepping into a high stress job.

The Routine Tasks of Medical Flight Professionals

While the pilot is expected to run routine checks to keep the chopper health up, the medical flight crew members are required to ensure that all inventory and medical equipment are in place, the batteries are all charged up and basically ensure that all equipments are working fine so that they can effectively respond to emergencies. The station duties can range from keeping a tab on the blood fridge and logging fridge values to cleaning and taking out the trash. Each member assumes a responsibility when they are docked in the hangar.

Responding to Emergencies

While the medical flight professionals usually conduct several station duties, they subconsciously are always anticipating an emergency call. The moment it comes in, they are expected to leave everything and take up the duties that enable them to face the emergency effectively. They immediately do all that is needed to know about the patient health condition and equip the medical flight with all the necessities. The medical staff are alerted in the nearest appropriate hospital and logistics are quickly and efficiently taken care of. It should be noted that, in view of the fact that the entire routine is quite stressful, the crew is always allowed enough rest hours every day and are encouraged to get enough relaxation between shifts.

Pertinent Questions to Be Asked Before Airambulance Dispatch

The questions that we discuss in this guide are primarily related to motor vehicle accidents. It must be noted that this is just a suggestive guide and only briefly looks into the various aspects that need to be covered when answering initial calls for airambulance dispatch. Most of the times, the calls are routed to airambulance service providers by emergency services. However, on rare occasions, calls may be made directly to the service providers. This guide may be helpful to an extent in situations like these.

Initial Questions to be Asked When a Request for Airambulance is Made

After a brief introduction and convincing the caller help is already on the way and that the call is in no way delaying the emergency response, attempts must be made to gain information regarding the motor vehicle accident victims. The caller should be asked whether he or she is still on the scene and whether the caller can see the patient. If the answer is negative, it is better to terminate the call and answer other calls pertaining to the same incident. However, if the answer comes in the positive, a different approach with a different set of questions must be followed.

The Subsequent Questions to be Asked

The person who calls the airambulance must be asked to quickly narrate what has transpired. Stock must be taken of the number of casualties and the caller must be asked where the patient is at the current time. Additionally, questions pertaining to the incident, in specific, must be asked. These could include the speed of the vehicle during the crash, the surface that the patient has fallen on, whether the patient is trapped, whether there are any burn injuries, etc. Apart from this, questions that are specific to the patient’s condition must be asked. These could be whether the patient is conscious and coherent, and whether the patient is breathing normally.

Questions like these will help you ascertain the seriousness of the situation and whether any ancillary services are required.

Categorizing Reasons Why a Medical Flight Cannot Respond to Calls At Times

There are several terms used to describe a situation where a medial flight does not arrive even after a call. The reasons behind this could be several but it is important to categorize these using appropriate terminologies so that an organization that owns the medical flights can optimize and also gauge its effectiveness. It makes gathering of meaningful data easy. Let’s explore these terminologies in some detail.

Cancelled Medical Flight Calls

The category ‘cancelled’ should only be used to describe those situations where the medical flight has taken off, but it is asked to return when it is en route to the patient’s location. The reason behind this could be demise of the subject that warranted the air ambulance service in the first place or a change in situation where it is felt that the medical condition is not serious enough to warrant a medical flight.

Stand Down of a Medical Flight

When the risk of flying to a particular location is too high, the mission to serve the patient is usually abandoned. All such instances must be categorized under ‘stand downs’. This directly affects the dispatch rate but it is a call that must be taken keeping the safety of the crew in mind.

Aborted Missions

The decision to abort a medical flight mission is usually only taken when the weather condition is too harsh to fly. Missions can also be aborted owing to mechanical problems or inability to fly during bad light.

Once all the missed flights are segregated in the above categories, it becomes easy for the medical flight service provider to gauge what is causing the changes in the dispatch rates. Any areas of improvement such as night vision must be dealt with so that superior service and better dispatch rate can be achieved. The categorization also helps medical flight organizations to set targets and better organize themselves.

Factors that Determine the Need for Medical Flight Service

As we have time and again discussed, the decision to avail a medical flight service, most often, is in the hands of the treating physician and the patient has little say in it. However, it is always good to have the knowledge of what constitutes a medical necessity for availing an air ambulance service.

Criticality of Time and Treatment Facility

In a situation where the injury or health condition is serious enough that immediate medical attention is warranted and an air ambulance can cut down the travel time greatly, such a service becomes a necessity. It also becomes a necessity when the medical facility in which the patient is receiving treatment is not equipped enough to handle the patient’s condition. The patient may be in need of immediate advanced medical care.

Accessibility to Ground Ambulance and Availability of Medical Flight Service

Certain areas, especially rural, might not have the land infrastructure to transport the patient. In such cases, if a medical flight service becomes available right away, it can be a real life saver. For a medical helicopter, all it takes is a helipad, which most hospitals have today.

Does the Local Ground Transport Leave the Local Area with Inadequate Coverage?

This is an important question that needs to be answered. Rural towns, often have just one or two air ambulances for the entire community. Shifting a patient to a medical facility that is quite a distance from the home base can leave the local community without adequate emergency medical access. A medical flight may be opted in a situation like this.

Medical Facility Available in the Transport Vehicle

Ground ambulance may lack in certain critical care equipment that are available in a medical flight service. In a situation like that, even if time is not a factor, the patient might still be transported via a medical flight service.