Category Archives: Conditions

Guidelines for Handling Medical Flight Patients Who Have Fainted (Part 2)

In a previous post, we talked about some of the specific guidelines you need to follow when treating patients who have fainted. Also known as syncope, fainting is a common occurrence and as a medical flight paramedic, you may encounter a few patients in this situation. In this post, you’ll get more details about the guidelines released by the American College of Cardiology so you can get a thorough understanding of what to do.

More tips on handling medical flight patients with syncope

The previous post talked about the initial steps you need to take when you encounter a patient who has fainted. And those steps can be used by medical flight paramedics. According to the American College of Cardiology, health care professionals can follow the guidelines below when they have to treat a patient who faints:

  1. Some patients may have fainted because of irregular heartbeats, which can even be life-threatening. To determine whether your patient is facing this issue, doctors can use an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator to regulate the heartbeats.
  2. For syncope patients who have heart conditions, beta-blockers can be a good option.
  3. Health care providers should advise fainting patients to restrict their exercise in the future.
  4. Patients with recurring fainting spells resulting from very low heart rate might require pacemakers. In case of patients with common faints, drugs may be enough to control the situation.
  5. In case of unexplained fainting, heart rhythm monitoring is a good option to determine whether or not the patient has intermittent heart rhythm issues resulting in fainting.

The American College of Cardiology also advises athletes with fainting issues to visit an experienced health care provider for a heart assessment. These are some of the basic guidelines that can help in providing the right level of care for people who faint.

Role of Air Ambulance Services in Organ Transplant

It’s often a long and painful wait for an organ donor, no matter which part of the world you’re from. The number of donors around the world is much lesser than those waiting for a donor. Then, there is the issue of organ suitability. All these issues make finding an organ a prized opportunity. It is also vital that the organ reaches the recipient on time and this is where the air ambulance services often come into picture.

How Do Air Ambulance Services Help?

Air ambulance services help transport organs from the remotest of the places to the recipient in the shortest possible time. While air ambulance choppers are used for short distances, fixed wing medical aircrafts are used for longer distances. The air ambulance services are always available on-call in situations like these where a few minutes can mean the difference between life and death. Air ambulance services are considered 100% safe when transporting organs such as kidneys and liver. There are instances where even heart has been airlifted.

What Makes Air Ambulance Services Ideal for Organ Transport?

Two obvious reasons are the reach and the time taken by air ambulance services. The sophisticated aircrafts also provide a congenial environment for carrying the human organs. Unexpected eventualities like road blocks are virtually nonexistent. The air ambulance services also pave way to carry the patient quickly – with all necessary medical care – to a facility that specializes in organ transplantation. We need to understand that often recipients too are carried to a particular location, depending on factors such as time and availability of specialized hospitals.

The point to note is that most air ambulance services will take complete responsibility of coordinating the entire transport so that the organ reaches safely and on time. There are also insurance covers available to cover such air ambulance services. All it takes is a bit of planning and coordinated effort.

Air Ambulance – Pregnancy

When a pregnant woman experiences complications, they can be life-threatening for both mother and child, and often require the specialized care found in larger hospitals. Timely Air Ambulance transfer to such facilities while the patient(s) receives care from obstetrical/ neonatal specialists has been shown to be safe, cost-effective and beneficial. Transfer via critical care ground ambulance is also successfully employed in these kinds of cases. However, when time is critical and a specialty team from the receiving hospital is sent to bring the patient(s) to the specialty center, air ambulance transport minimizes the out of hospital time for both the patient and the specialty care givers in a way that cannot be accomplished via ground.

Air Ambulance – Cardiac Care and “Heart Attacks”

A heart attack occurs when an artery in the heart is blocked by a clot, and the heart muscle supplied by that artery is therefore deprived of oxygen. This causes chest pain, and the muscle is in jeopardy of dying. Untreated, these blockages can permanently damage the heart causing death or an otherwise reduced quality of life.

As with critical injuries, there is a window of time (generally thought to be two hours from symptom onset) in which the heart may be effectively treated before it, and the patient, die or are disabled. At any time in this window, the compromised heart may stop or otherwise require emergency treatment to keep the patient alive. Out of hospital, HEMS ALS has proven effective in dealing with these emergencies. Ultimately, these patients need either special medications or surgical procedures at specialist cardiac intervention hospitals to break up the blood clot, allowing blood and the oxygen it brings to return to the affected heart muscle. Done within those two hours, the heart may be undamaged or damage may be limited, allowing the patient not only to live, but to recover a normal life.

Similar to trauma centers, cardiac intervention centers have been developed to provide the more effective of these increasinglycommon surgical treatments. The scarcity of cardiac intervention centers, particularly outside of urban areas, suggest a role, supported by studies to date, for HEMS in quickly transporting patients, even patients whose hearts have stopped and been restarted, from remote hospitals to these centers.

Air Ambulance – Cerebrovascular Accidents / Strokes and “Brain Attacks”

Like heart attacks, some strokes are caused by interruption of blood predominately from a blood clot, only this time in the brain. As in heart attacks, there is a window of time (optimally within 90 minutes but generally no more than three hours) in which clotbusting treatment can result in patients suffering little to no long term damage and disability from these events. Therefore, patients transported to specialty centers for the clot-busting treatment of strokes can benefit from a well-coordinated ground and air system to accomplish early transfer.