Tag Archives: air ambulance guidelines

Airambulance cabin filled with Medical Equipment

Structural Guidelines for Fixed Wing Airambulance Transport

All most all states in the United States have laid down certain minimum requirements that a fixed wing airambulance must satisfy. The guidelines given below have been issued by the state of Tennessee but the structural guidelines are, in general, similar in other states too.

Airambulance Doors

The doors of the airambulance must be wide enough that a stretcher can be passed through it without tilting it more than 30 degrees. This guideline ensures that the transit of the patient into the airambulance is safely done.

Vertical Height of the Airambulance

It is vital that there is enough headspace so that the medical personnel can function optimally and provide adequate care for the patient. For this reason, all airambulance vehicles must have a minimum vertical height of 30 inches.

The lighting of the Aircraft

The electrical capacity of the airambulance must be equipped to provide “sufficient” light inside, such that medical care is not hindered due to lack of it. The service providers are allowed to make use of portable lamps to achieve this.

Guidelines for Airambulance Equipments

To ensure stability of the patient while entering the aircraft and during the transport, the stretchers must be fitted with at least two restraining straps to keep the patient in place.

The suction devices must have a capacity to produce suction of at least 12 inches of mercury.

Oxygen bags or masks must be available within the airambulance. There must be enough stock so that 95% fraction inspired oxygen is available at all times. The equipment must be capable of adjusting flow between 2 to 5 liters of oxygen per minute.

Adequate sanitary supplies like trash disposal bags, emesis bags, urinal, bedpan, towels, etc, must be available.

Basic tools like stethoscope, blood pressure cuff, dressing materials, and flashlights must be kept handy.

As a patient and a customer availing airambulance services, it is your right to have these facilities and being aware of such basic things about air ambulances can help.

Patient on a stretcher with paramedics

Preparing the Patient for a Medical Flight

It is important that the medical flight taken by a patient is both safe and comfortable. Following certain guidelines ensures that the medical flight transport is carried out smoothly and quickly. Here, we discuss the vital considerations that must top your mind.

Proper Documentation for Medical Flight

Laws specify that transfer orders by the treating physician and acceptance documents by the receiving facility must be in order before the patient boards a medical flight. Also, the patient’s medical chart, discharge summary, lab results and other medical information must be carried. A photo ID is vital and must be kept handy. Consent for medical flight transport must be sent to the air ambulance operator beforehand.

Medications and Equipments during the Medical Flight

An IV access must be ready. If the patient does not need IV access on a continuing basis, it can be capped. All medications that are necessary and those that are meant for comfort must be administered. These meds must also be provided to the crew in case the need arises midair. This also includes IV medications.

Casts, Traction, and Diapers

If the patient is being treated with a circumferential cast, it must be bivalved beforehand. Hanging weights for traction are not suited for a medical flight. Appropriate traction device must be used instead. An unconscious patient must be diapered prior to transfer to the medical flight and any tube feeding must be discontinued about 7 to 8 hours in advance.

Accompanying the Patient in Medical Flight

The passenger accompanying the patient must have prior approval. If the condition of the patient demands that no one accompanies him or her during the medical flight, the passenger must comply. Most fixed wing aircrafts have limited space and one must understand that it is essential for the medical staff to have enough space to function efficiently. Even when accompanying the patient, the passenger must occupy minimum space possible.

Knowing these guidelines well in advance helps make the medical flight travel a comfortable one.

Is Air Ambulance Transport the Right Option? Answering these Questions Can Help

Deciding whether a patient needs air ambulance transport can be a tough decision, even for a doctor sometimes. In this realm, asking certain questions before deciding on air ambulance transport can help. Below are a few of them.

Does the condition warrant that patient spends least possible time out of hospital?

If the answer is yes, then the patient might be best suited for air ambulance transport as it is quicker than ground transport.

Is a time-sensitive facility unavailable in the current treating facility?

Certain lifesaving facilities or treatments might not be available in the hospital that is treating the patient at the current time. Air ambulance transport might become essential to carry the patient to the nearest medical center that has this facility.

Is the area only accessible through air ambulance transport?

Certain remote areas that have bad or no roads can only reached through air ambulance transport. Air ambulance choppers obviously are preferred during such cases.

Is the weather suitable for air ambulance transport?

The new FAA guidelines for air ambulance transport and the general safety concern for the crew prevents use of air ambulances when the weather conditions are unfavorable.

Is the weight of the patient, equipment and crew within permissible limit of air ambulance transport?

The permissibility of weight might also depend on the kind of aircraft that is available during the emergency. However, weight is a concern that must be addressed.

Is there an airport or helipad to land the air ambulance near the receiving facility?

If the landing facilities are not available, air ambulance transport might not at all be an option. Landing at a considerable distance and carrying the patient to the receiving facility through ground ambulance might defeat the purpose of using air ambulance transport.

Does the ground transport lack critical care support?

Air ambulances usually are extremely well equipped. If the ground ambulance lacks such support, then air ambulance transport might be the only option.

Will use of ground ambulance leave local area with inadequate emergency coverage?

If the answer is yes, then air medical transport might have to be opted so that the medical facility is prepared to meet other potential emergencies locally.

Answering these questions can help make split second decisions, which can mean the difference between life and death during emergencies.